COVID-19 Business Tool Kit

1) HIGHLIGHTS of the CARES Act. 
This legislation is aimed at providing relief for individuals and businesses that have been negatively impacted by the coronavirus outbreak. While that is great news, in and of itself, here’s a look at some of the key provisions included in the bill and what that may mean for you:
Direct payments: Americans who pay taxes will receive a one-time direct deposit of up to $1,200, and married couples will receive $2,400, plus an additional $500 per child. The payments will be available for incomes up to $75,000 for individuals and $150,000 for married couples. 
Unemployment: The program provides $250 billion for an extended unemployment insurance program and expands eligibility and offers workers an additional $600 per week for four months, on top of what state programs pay. It also extends UI benefits through Dec. 31 for eligible workers. The deal applies to the self-employed, independent contractors and gig economy workers.
Payroll taxes: The measure allows employers to delay the payment of their portion of 2020 payroll taxes until 2021 and 2022.
Use of retirement funds: The bill waives the 10% early withdrawal penalty for distributions up to $100,000 for coronavirus-related purposes, retroactive to Jan. 1. Withdrawals are still taxed, but taxes are spread over three years, or the taxpayer has the three-year period to roll it back over.
401(k) Loans: The loan limit is increased from $50,000 to $100,000
RMDs suspended: Required Minimum Distributions from IRAs and 401(k) plans (at age 72) are suspended.
Charity. There is a new provision that provides an above-the-line deduction for charitable contributions, plus, the limits on charitable contributions are changed.
Small business relief: $350 billion is being dedicated to preventing layoffs and business closures while workers have to stay home during the outbreak. Companies with 500 employees or fewer that maintain their payroll during coronavirus can receive up to 8 weeks of cash-flow assistance. If employers maintain payroll, the portion of the loans used for covered payroll costs, interest on mortgage obligations, rent, and utilities would be forgiven.
Net Operating Losses: The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) net operating loss rules are modified. The 80% rule is lifted, and losses can now be carried back five years.
Excess Loss Limitations: The excess loss limitation (ELL) rules for pass-through entities are suspended.
Interest Expense Limitation: The interest expense limitations are increased to 50% from 30% for tax years beginning in 2019 or 2020. Taxpayers can also elect to calculate the interest limitation for 2020 using their 2019 adjusted taxable income as the relevant base, which often will be significantly higher.
Large corporations: $500 billion will be allotted to provide loans, loan guarantees, and other investments, these will be overseen by a Treasury Department inspector general. These loans will not exceed five years and cannot be forgiven. Airlines will receive $50 billion (of the $500 billion) for passenger air carriers, and $8 billion for cargo air carriers.
Hospitals and health care: The deal provides over $140 billion in appropriations to support the U.S. health system, $100 billion of which will be injected directly into hospitals. The rest will be dedicated to providing personal and protective equipment for health care workers, testing supplies, increased workforce and training, accelerated Medicare payments, and supporting the CDC, among other health investments.
Coronavirus testing: All testing and potential vaccines for COVID-19 will be covered at no cost to patients.
States and local governments: State, local and tribal governments will receive $150 billion. $30 billion is set aside for states, and educational institutions. $45 billion is for disaster relief, and $25 billion for transit programs.
Agriculture: The deal would increase the amount the Agriculture Department can spend on its bailout program from $30 billion to $50 billion.
For more information, you can see the full Bill, HERE 
Source: FORBES
2.) Is your organization ELIGIBLE? 
There are many ways that the travel industry can tap into federal assistance through the CARES Act. It is important to note that while we will be urging the federal agencies to expedite their regulations to ensure impacted businesses can access loans immediately, processes will evolve. The menu below should be considered a guide to help direct you to the type of assistance for which your organization may be eligible. More detailed documents seek to help give you as much information as we can at this time. 
MORE INFORMATION 
Source: US Travel 
3.) Small Business GUIDE and CHECKLIST 
The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act allocated $350 billion to help small businesses keep workers employed amid the pandemic and economic downturn. Known as the Paycheck Protection Program, the initiative provides 100% federally guaranteed loans to small businesses. Importantly, these loans may be forgiven if borrowers maintain their payrolls during the crisis or restore their payrolls afterward. 
MORE INFORMATION
Source: US Chamber 
4.) Employers Avoid Layoffs 
We encourage employers to enroll in the Shared Work program. Find out if your business is eligible. Shared Work program provides Texas employers with an alternative to layoffs. TWC developed this voluntary program to help Texas employers and employees withstand a slowdown in business.
MORE INFORMATION
Source: Texas Workforce Commision 

5.) Non-profit Emergency Grant
The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act temporarily expands eligibility for SBA economic injury disaster loans (EIDL) and provides an emergency advance of up to $10,000 to small businesses and private non-profits harmed by COVID-19 within 3 days of applying for an SBA Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL). To access the advance, you first apply for an EIDL and then request the advance. The advance does not need to be repaid under any circumstance, and may be used to keep employees on payroll, to pay for sick leave, meet increased production costs due to supply chain disruptions, or pay business obligations, including debts,  rent, and mortgage payments. 
Eligibility
In addition to the entities that are already eligible for SBA disaster loans (small businesses, private non-profits, and small agriculture cooperatives), eligibility is temporarily expanded to include:
  • Business entities with 500 or fewer employees:
  • Sole proprietorships, with or without employees
  • Independent contractors
  • Cooperatives and employee-owned businesses
  • Tribal small businesses
  • Private non-profits of any size.
More Information HERE
6.) Small Business Webinar 
The SBA’s Lower Rio Grande Valley District Office joined the Edinburg Chamber of Commerce to provide information about the SBA Economic Injury Disaster Loan Program.
This webinar addressed small businesses interested in applying for the SBA’s Economic Injury Disaster Loan that will cover vital economic support to small businesses to help overcome the temporary loss of revenue they are experiencing due to COVID-19. These loans may be used to pay fixed debts, payroll, accounts payable and other bills that can’t be paid because of the disaster’s impact. If you are a small business that meets the criteria above and have been impacted by COVID-19 then this webinar is for you.
Small businesses may apply online, receive additional disaster assistance information and download applications at https://disasterloan.sba.gov/ela. Applicants may also call SBA’s Customer Service Center at (800) 659-2955 or email [email protected] for more information on SBA disaster assistance. Individuals who are deaf or hard-of-hearing may call (800) 877-8339. Completed applications should be mailed to U.S. Small Business Administration, Processing and Disbursement Center, 14925 Kingsport Road, Fort Worth, TX 76155.
 Contact the Lower Rio Grande Valley District Office at 956-427-8533 for questions or the Edinburg Chamber of Commerce at [email protected]
View Webinar